A Detailed Backlink Indexing Case Study

backlink

All good SEOs know that the key to ranking (for now, anyway) is good backlinks.  And an important part of measuring backlinks quality is whether it’s indexed.  A black hat SEO who know did an analysis of backlink indexing services, and the results are going to surprise you.  Read an excerpt of the report below…

Many claims have been made in the backlink indexing space, and services continue to be launched and improved.  Being exposed to these services through my current SEO efforts with GSA, I felt it was important to identify the most cost effective approach to indexing backlinks.

In researching this topic, I was surprised to find very limited research covering this important topic.  After all, it is assumed that every serious SEO is using some form of these services.  There was one commonly seen study done in 2011, but the sample size was extremely small (just 500 links) and the results were quickly identified as suspect in the forums.

Disclaimer:  This test was conducted independently with no financial support or free accounts given.  Any facts associated with the services were obtained either through contacting support or reading materials on the respective sites.  As with all SEO services, use at your own risk.

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Study Specifications

Links used:
10,000 verified links produced by a standard GSA job containing all link types. These links were produced a maximum of 24 hours before submission to the service for this test.
• Where price was unreasonable (over $1 per thousand), the test was limited to 1,000 for that service

Indexing checking tool:
Indexing was checked using the index checker in Scrapebox. Hundreds of US-based fully private proxies were used on a lengthy delay, and the tests were rerun as many times as necessary to check all the links. Initially I tried using the GScraper index checker with their proxy subscription and got extremely unreliable results. Not only were their proxies public and thus highly burned out, but they often wouldn’t be US proxies and so would get inconsistent results between checks. I have to say it’s unfortunate that Google has tightened down on the use of index checking – this was a real pain.

Sites/Services Tested

BacklinksIndexer.com
Indexing service that aims to index by building up backlinks to your backlinks (roughly 15 links per link).
Pro: Builds a lot of links to your links. Will automatically resubmit your links if you aren’t using your quota.
Con: Doesn’t ping all links or track crawls.
Cost: $14.99 for 50/day – $99.99 for 500/day
Indexing: 6.67%

Blog Comments
Some of the indexing services use backlinks as a core function of getting links indexed. For this reason I felt it was important to do a simple baseline test to see how effective they are at getting links indexed. For this test, 2 indexed links were built every day for every 1 link loaded. (This was done in an earlier test)

After two weeks, indexing rate of the control group was within 20% of links that had blog comments built to them. This indicates that there is extremely limited benefit to building blog comment backlinks to backlinks.

Cost: Free (if you have Scrapebox/GSA or other blog commenting tool)

Lindexed.com
Service that creates pages, sitemaps, and rss feeds that contain your link and pings them from multiple locations.
Pro: Very robust pinging service. Pings from multiple locations and times, plus creates some content pages.
Cons: Doesn’t track crawls to verify links have been found. Uses RSS feeds which some have linked to ranking penalties.
Cost: $24.97 for 50k/day
Indexing: 4.7%

Linklicious.co
Pings links on a schedule. Tracks crawls and re-pings as needed.
Pro: Guarantees Google finds links. Good coupons for link building services.
Cons: Doesn’t build content pages like most other services.
Cost: $17 for 15k/day – $57 for 50k/day
Indexing: 6%

Indexification.com
Creates rss feeds and pings each link several times. Creates site maps and content pages.
Pro: Cheapest pinging and crawling service. Builds some pages for the links too.
Con: Uses RSS feeds which some have linked to ranking penalties.
Cost: $17.97 for 50,000/day
Indexing: 5%

IndexKings.com
Creates links using stat and whois site lists using your links. Just post into their web form.
Price: Free
Pro: Free, fast, easy to use
Con: Doesn’t actually do anything with the links it creates, so Google will never find them. Completely useless.
Indexing: NA

Nuclear-Link-Indexer.com
Creates RSS feeds of your links and then builds backlinks to assist in indexing.
Pro: Simple to use interface, builds links to your links.
Cons: Very unreliable service with outages/crashes and support issues. Stops if hits 50% indexing.
Cost: $7 for 33/day to $327 for 3,333/day
Indexing: 10%

PingFarm.com
Web-based tool to ping your links.
Pro: Free
Con: Doesn’t actually work due to cross site scripting security blocks in all browsers. Open the javascript debugger and you’ll see it doesn’t work yet report it does. Seriously, it’s never worked!
Cost: Free
Indexing: NA

Scrapebox’s Rapid Indexer
Creates links using stat and whois site lists using your links.
Pro: Free, fast, easy to use
Con: Doesn’t actually do anything with the links it creates, so Google will never find them. Completely useless.
Cost: Free with Scrapebox license
Indexing: NA

Xindexer2 (SENukeX’s tool)
Submits links to PR blog network for a month.
Pro: Validates links and indexing before submission and during processing.
Cons: Builds links to links once a week for 4 weeks (so very slow). Most expensive by far.
Cost: 100/day for $27, 1000/day for $210
Indexing: 5.3% after a month

Indexing Results – Data

backlink-indexing-service-comparison

The data used in the chart above is included for further analysis.  This data includes the three services that do not work.

Day 0

      Day 1

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

Backlinks Indexer

0.5

2.1

3.2

4.3

6.5

8.1

8.3

Blog Comments

0.7

1.2

1.4

3.9

4.5

5.1

5.4

Control (Nothing done)

0.5

1.8

2.3

2.7

3.3

4.5

4.9

Lindexed

0.6

1.5

2.8

2.9

3.8

5.1

5.3

Linklicious

0.4

4.9

5.6

6.5

7.3

7.6

7.9

Indexification

0.3

1.9

3.3

4.2

6.7

8.1

8.5

Index Kings

0.5

1.3

1.9

2.3

3.5

4.7

5.1

Nuclear Link Indexer

0.4

11.2

11.9

12.1

13.3

14.8

15

One Hour Indexing

0.3

35.3

42.5

43.2

44.8

43.9

46.3

Ping Farm

0.4

1

2.3

2.5

3.3

4.2

4.5

Scrapebox Rapid Indexer

0.5

0.9

1.7

2.3

3

4.1

4.2

Xindexer

0.6

1.3

1.9

2.4

3.2

3.7

13.2

 

Conclusions

–          One Hour Indexing is the clear winner in both indexing rate and cost.  They won’t disclose their methods, but clearly it’s something different than the other guys.

–          The requirements for indexing have changed over the past couple of years.  It is now much harder to get links indexed.

–          The techniques used by the services don’t seem to have a strong impact on indexing.  I expected services like Indexification and Lindexed to blow away the others since they have a hybrid method, but that didn’t happen.

–          A few services people recommend – Ping Farm, Index Kings, Scrapebox Rapid Indexer – literally do nothing since it just accesses a dynamic page (that Google never sees).  Think about this when you read forum posts where people say it’s working great for them.

–          Notice the control group as well as the three services that don’t work to see variance in the numbers.   The natural indexing rate isn’t a fixed number, but has some amount of variance.

–         Cost isn’t the primary deciding factor of which service is best.  Instead, match the amount of links you build with the appropriate service(s).

 

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One thought on “A Detailed Backlink Indexing Case Study

  1. Mantas says:

    Thanks Justin for a nice post.

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